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Black Tea

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Black tea is generally grown in China, India, Sri Lanka and Africa.  But you will find black teas from other regions of the world.  These happen to be where the majority comes from.  It is the most common tea in North America and Europe.

It has a strong aromatic flavor and produces a fairly dark liquor depending on steeping time and method.

Black tea generally takes milk well and is great hot or iced.  And makes a nice tea latte. It is the most popular type of tea today.  

What makes black tea....well.....black tea?  It's all in the process it goes through.  Black tea is fully fermented.  But not fermented in the way we normally think (it's not alcoholic).  Fermenting is the process of oxidation of the enzymes in the leaf juices.  This occurs after the leaves have been gently bruised or agitated.  Have you ever seen an apple or a potato turn brown after cutting it open?  This is oxidation.  This "fermenting" of tea leaves will bring out the flavors, strength and the color of the infusion (liquor).  The amount of fermentation is determined by the desired outcome the tea producer is trying to achieve.  Fermentation is halted by the introduction of heat in a pan or a giant oven.

Black teas may be found single origin or may even be a blend of different origins.  And then there is also flavored black teas.  They can be flavored with a variety of methods: herbals, sweets (such as chocolate chips, candy pieces, etc), coffee beans, natural or artificial flavorings, and even some fruits and florals.

To prepare Black Tea:
1 tsp ~ 8 oz water ~ 212 F ~ 3-5 minutes